San Si Jin – Silk Reeling Exercises

Coordinating your mind and body is a natural evolution of energetic awareness and opening your joints. Although all aspects of Qi Gong practice require attention and coordination, it is essential to spend some time during each practice focusing on moving in a very coordinated and expressive way.

One of the most subtle and coordinated forms of movement in Qi Gong is called Silk Reeling (San Si Jin). Silk Reeling involves certain expressive qualities of dance, martial arts and performing something precise like surgery. Silk Reeling can be incorporated into all kinds of movement and will profoundly enhance your coordination and appreciation for being graceful.

The term Silk Reeling describes a form of movement that is very connected and coordinated. This way of moving is, perhaps, the most subtle, graceful and intricate aspect of coordinating your
Mind and Body in Qi Gong Practice. There are two very specific silk reeling skills that allow you to begin this practice.

The first skill
is to move at a constant pace, somewhat like a very fluid clock. In order to understand this aspect of Silk Reeling, I encourage you visualize that you are drawing a silk thread out of its cocoon. If you were to move to quickly the thread would break, and if you suddenly slow down the silk would bead up and also break. For this reason we must move at a constant and gentle pace, not speeding up or slowing down.

The second skill to develop in Silk Reeling practice is a constant sense of rotation or spirals in
all of your movements. When drawing silk out of its cocoon you must also rotate the thread at a constant pace or else the thread will knot up and break. In practice, this is accomplished by rotating all of your joints as you move.

This is a very deliberate kind of movement. With practice, all of your joints will begin to generate very circular and fluid movements that wind and unwind, expand and contract. These rotations must also move at a fairly constant pace. Timing these two types of movement together requires some devoted practice. As your practice develops, each spiral that you generate will be expressed evenly and completely through each gesture. These details of Silk Reeling movement are explored very thoroughly throughout the following exercises. They are not difficult to learn, just difficult to describe.

The first instructional video covers the essential principles of Silk Reeling and some fundamental exercises to get you started on the journey towards coordination and profound bodily awareness.

The second instructional video adds some intermediate Silk Reeling exercises and take you deeper into the exploration and mastery of your Pocket muscles.

The third instructional video includes some advanced Silk Reeling exercises and introduces you to the three basins of Qi Gong Practice.

The fourth video is a follow along video. There is minimal verbal instruction so you can follow along and see how much you have learned from the instructional videos and get some uninterrupted practice. Remember that Silk Reeling takes a few months of obsessing (in a good way) about your posture and every detail about how you move.